Every Study Ever Conducted on the Impact Converting Street Parking Into Bike Lanes Has on Businesses

An annotated, chart-filled review of 12 studies from around the world.

Source: Every Study Ever Conducted on the Impact Converting Street Parking Into Bike Lanes Has on Businesses – CityLab

The status quo isn’t going to topple itself. Even with good science, economics, and morality on the side of doing what is necessary; the automobile culture is entrenched.

San Francisco Debates a New Law That Would Allow Bike Riders to Yield at Stop Signs

A proposal to make San Francisco the first major city to adopt the so-called “Idaho stop” is under intense debate.

Source: San Francisco Debates a New Law That Would Allow Bike Riders to Yield at Stop Signs – CityLab

With research showing that it decreases injuries to bicyclists while having no impact on pedestrian injuries…and with a cost of ZERO, it would seem like a no-brainer.

urb-i – ideas & inspiration for better cities

urb-i – ideas & inspiration for better cities simple transformations can change the way we perceive public space

Source: urb-i – ideas & inspiration for better cities

Extensive before and after slideshow of cities around the world making streets more pedestrian friendly. We are probably 20 to 30 years away from any such movement here. The feds along with their puppets in the state houses and their stilted anally retentive traffic engineers will wait until the coasts are under water and the vast majority of farmland has been paved over before acting in even the most tentative ways. In the mean time, we will have to be happy with a few experiments on the coasts.

What Are Traffic Waves and Why Do They Happen So Much?

What Are Traffic Waves and Why Do They Happen So Much? | The Lowdown.

Nice overview of why spontaneous traffic jams occur, complete with simulation.

The simplest explanation for why traffic waves happen is that drivers have relatively slow reaction times: if the car in front of you suddenly slows down, it’ll likely take you a second or so to hit the brakes. The slower your reaction time, the harder you have to brake to compensate and keep a safe distance. The same goes for the car behind you, which has to brake even harder than you did in order to slow down faster. And so on down the road, in a domino-like effect.